Resources

Check out Resources on Nutrient Pollution and Best Practices. Click any link to view full resource.

PROPOSAL FOR URGENT NEED TO CREATE WATER QUALITY PROGRAM

May 17, 2021

We strongly support the creation of a new department within Teton County dedicated to the protection of water resources. The department would serve as the chief water quality administrator for Teton County. It would represent the county’s interests in all matters that may have an impact on water quality, including but not limited to local, state and federal planning, regulatory processes, permitting and decision making. Protection of water quality would be its priority and sole focus.

 


Protect our Water Jackson Hole - 2020 Annual Report

Protect our Water Jackson Hole - 2020 Annual Report

March 2021

Despite the challenges presented by the COVID-19 pandemic, Protect our Water JH made important progress toward both short and long term goals in regards to Teton County, WY, water quality, through both public campaigns and local government collaboration. Read about it in our 2020 Annual Report.


Comments on Proposed Updates to the 2012 Comprehensive Plan

Comments on Proposed Updates to the 2012 Comprehensive Plan

September 10, 2020

Comments submitted on behalf of Wyoming Outdoor Council, Protect Our Water Jackson Hole, and the Jackson Hole Conservation Alliance in response to the Public Review Draft of the 2020 Comprehensive Plan Update released on July 29, 2020. Our comments focus on the demonstrated need to include enhanced water quality protections in the updated Comp Plan, and offer a number of suggestions for strengthening the level of protection for our critically important water resources.


Proposal for Rulemaking to Protect Teton County’s Public Water Systems

September 1, 2020

Proposal submitted on behalf of  Protect Our Water Jackson Hole and Wyoming Outdoor Council recommending a draft rule for consideration that would require all public water systems located in Teton County to register with the health department. Also, in the event that nitrate levels in public water systems reach 3 mg/L or higher, a number of actions would be triggered, including reporting and public notice. The proposed rule also specifies that if nitrate levels exceed 3 mg/L in two consecutive months, or three times in any calendar year, an investigation of the public water system, wellhead(s), and surrounding area must be conducted. The final provision requires all public water systems in Teton County to have a Wyoming DEQ-approved source water assessment and source water protection plan on file with the health department, and to make those plans available to the public upon request.


Wastewater Is Key to Reducing Nitrogen Pollution

Wastewater Is Key to Reducing Nitrogen Pollution

Scientific American – June 2, 2016

Upgrading wastewater treatment plants can dramatically reduce a municipality’s nitrogen footprint. Upgrading wastewater treatment facilities as well as household septic systems can be expensive, but such measures can dramatically return bodies of water to health.


Septic tanks aren't keeping feces out of rivers, lakes

Septic tanks aren't keeping feces out of rivers, lakes

ScienceDaily – Michigan State University, August 3, 2015

The notion that septic tanks prevent fecal bacteria from seeping into rivers and lakes simply doesn’t hold water, says a 2015 study. A team of water detectives has discovered freshwater contamination stemming from septic systems.


Approved Waste Management Planning Cost Share Proposal

Approved Waste Management Planning Cost Share Proposal

Revised proposal that lays out the funding request details in partnership with Teton Conservation District that was submitted to the Teton County Commissioners and approved on June 30, 2020.

Revised proposal that lays out the funding request details in partnership with Teton Conservation District that was submitted to the Teton County Commissioners and approved on June 30, 2020.


Great Gravel

Great Gravel

Montana Outdoors, July-August 2017

New research shows how underground floodplains maintain healthy river “immune systems”.


Invisible Rivers Beneath our Feet with Dr. Ric Hauer

Invisible Rivers Beneath our Feet with Dr. Ric Hauer

National Museum of Wildlife Art and Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative

Dr. Ric Hauer’s presentation of “Invisible Rivers Beneath our Feet” about gravel-bed ecosystems with a special introduction by Dr. Harvey Locke.